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Dugong

Page history last edited by Lauren Perozek 9 years, 2 months ago

Dugong 

by Lauren Perozek 

 

Description 

The dugong is a saltwater mannmal that lives under the order of the sirenia. The dugong has thick grey skin with two flippers in the front  and a dolphin shape tail. It's nosrals are near the front of the dugong's muzzle to allow the dugong to come up for air every four to five minutes and remain almost completely  underwater. Dugongs will have one calf after 12-13 month pregnancy. They start to mature at ten years and oldest 15 to 17 years. Their average life span is 70 years old. Dugongs can grow up to 10 feet long and can weigh over 900 pounds. They are a slow animal which makes it easy for fisherman to kill. Because of the habit destrecoin, gill nets, pollution, and illegal fisherman the dugong is now an endangered species.

Habitat

Dugongs live in shallow areas up to ten feet. These shallow areas can be located in protective bays and wide mangrove channels. They live along the coasts of india and the westren pacific coasts. They have a territory of 4 to 46 square miles. 

 

Symbiotic Relationships 

Dugongs have a symbiotic relationship with remoras. The remora eats parasites that might be living on the host (dugong's) skin. In return the dugong provides the remora with protection from larger predators. Dugongs also have a symbiotic relationship with the sea grass. They eat the seagrass to the root allowing the seagrass to sprot new shoots from the shallow sea floor. Both of these relationships are examples go a mutual relationship.

 

 

 

 

Predator Adaptions 

The dugong has a downward facing muzzle that allows the dugongs mouth to be paraelle with the sea floor. This adaption helps the dug on to feed on the sea grass until there is only the roots that are under the sand. Another adoption is that dugong has really dense bone. Having dense bones helps the dugon sink in the water. Dugongs need this ablity because they are so big and slow that it would be hard for them to stay on the bottom of the sea floor and be constaly pushing them selves down.

Prey Adaptions 

Dugongs protect themselves by turning their back on the predator. By doing this it is hard for the predator jaws to get a grip on the dugong's big round bak. They have a lot of blubber protecting their bodies. Also they can swim with a high brust of speed ranging up to 25 nots. Their biotic predators are big sharks like the great white shark and salt water crocodiles.  

 

Similarities 

Dugongs and Bottlenose dolphins both live in tropical waters. Salt water mammals and have grey skin. Both animals can communicate with their own kin. They both have the same shaped tail. They both grow to a smiler height of around 3 metres. They are both fast swimmers.

                                                                                                                   

 

Differences 

Dolphins are carnivors and dugongs are herbivores. Dungongs also have smaller brains the dolphins. Dolphins are so smart that they can recognize their own refection in a mirror. Dugongs have the nostals on their muzzle and dolphins have one nostral called a blow whole on the top of their head.  

 

Sources 

Macdonald, N. 2011. "Dugong dugon" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed May 15, 2013 at http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Dugong_dugon/ 

 

"Dugong (Dugong dugon)." Encyclopedia of Endangered Species. Vol. 1. Gale, 2009.Science In Context. Web. 24 May 2013. 

 

"Abu Dhabi starts spatial mapping of its coastline." Khaleej Times [Dubai, United Arab Emirates] 12 Mar. 2013. World History In Context. Web. 26 May 2013.

 

 

Borg, Victor Paul. "Battle to save the dugongs." World and I Dec. 2007. World History In Context. Web. 26 May 2013. 

 

 

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. Dugongs. January 9, 2012. Australian Government. May 28, 2013 

 

 

 

Dugong. Photograph. Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest. Web. 29 May 2013.http://quest.eb.com/images/130_601511

Dugong.[Photograph]. Retrieved from Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest.http://quest.eb.com/images/130_601511

Dugong. [Photograph].Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest.Retrieved 29 May 2013, fromhttp://quest.eb.com/images/130_601511

Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest,"Dugong", accessed 29 May 2013,http://quest.eb.com/images/130_601511

Dugong. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest. Web. 29 May 2013.http://quest.eb.com/images/132_1315091

Dugong.[Photography]. Retrieved from Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest.http://quest.eb.com/images/132_1315091

Dugong. [Photography].Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest.Retrieved 29 May 2013, fromhttp://quest.eb.com/images/132_1315091

Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest,"Dugong", accessed 29 May 2013,http://quest.eb.com/images/132_1315091

Dugong (Dugong Dugon). Photograph. Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest. Web. 29 May 2013.http://quest.eb.com/images/130_565559

 

Dugong. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest. Web. 29 May 2013.http://quest.eb.com/images/132_1321922

Dugong.[Photography]. Retrieved from Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest.http://quest.eb.com/images/132_1321922

Dugong. [Photography].Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest.Retrieved 29 May 2013, fromhttp://quest.eb.com/images/132_1321922

Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest,"Dugong", accessed 29 May 2013,http://quest.eb.com/images/132_1321922

Bottlenose Dolphins. Photograph. Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest. Web. 29 May 2013.http://quest.eb.com/images/106_929825

Bottlenose Dolphins.[Photograph]. Retrieved from Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest.http://quest.eb.com/images/106_929825

Bottlenose Dolphins. [Photograph].Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest.Retrieved 29 May 2013, fromhttp://quest.eb.com/images/106_929825

Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest,"Bottlenose Dolphins", accessed 29 May 2013,http://quest.eb.com/images/106_929825

Dugong (Dugong Dugon).[Photograph]. Retrieved from Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest.http://quest.eb.com/images/130_565559

Dugong (Dugong Dugon). [Photograph].Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest.Retrieved 29 May 2013, fromhttp://quest.eb.com/images/130_565559

Encyclopædia Britannica Image Quest,"Dugong (Dugong Dugon)", accessed 29 May 2013,http://quest.eb.com/images/130_565559

 

Comments (1)

Michael R said

at 11:52 am on Jun 2, 2013

in prey adaptions you spelled back bak

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