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Minke Whale

Page history last edited by christopher.ionta@... 8 years, 11 months ago

                                                    Minke Whale 

Description

 

     The Minke whale is part of the Cetacea group. The Minke whale is dark grey and white. It measures 22-24 feet and weighs as much as 14 tons. Females often grow 1-2 feet more than the male and weigh a bit more. The Minke whale is the second smallest whale, compared to the blue whale who measures 105 feet the Minke whale is small. They have a thick layer of blubber which protects them from the cold. The Minke whale has large fins that measure 1/8 . Minke whales have between 240-360 baleen plates on each side of their mouth. They live from 30-50 years old, or sometimes in special cases 60 years.

 

Habitat

 

     Minke whales prefer boreal waters, but can also be found in tropical and subtropical waters. They often feed in cold waters at higher latitude. Minke whales can be found in both coastal/inshore and oceanic/offshore areas.

 

Predator adaptation

 

  • Communication 
  • They eat:
  • Plankton
  • Krill
  • Small fish
  • Swimming slowly threw zooplankton
  • When they eat fish they form a V  

 

Prey adaptation

  • Communication
  • Speed
  • Humans
  • Transient killer whales
  • Sharks 

 

Symbiosis: 

     

     Commencalism:

Barnacles take advantage of the Minke whale but the minke whale is not affected. 

 

Species similarities:

 

Similarities:

 The Minke whale is is similar other whale, the humpback whale. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources:

Leaper, R. "Whales, Porpoises, and Dolphins." Life Sciences. Marshall Cavendish Digital, 2013. Web. 04 June 2013.<http://www.marshallcavendishdigital.com/articledisplay/8/796/3303>.

 

Marinebio.org, 2013. web. 04 june 2013 

 

Wikipedia, 2013. web. 04 june 2013

Comments (1)

William brinckman-smith said

at 8:32 am on May 31, 2013

I suggest you link Humpback Whale with wiki web page

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